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HKCAll has surveyed candidates in Sunday’s (9 Sept) elections for the Legislative Council for their views on cycling.

The results show that many strongly support the substantive development of cycling for Hong Kong.  Some are better informed than others, but this is an important time for progress in many areas, with important decisions being made about key development projects, such as West Kowloon, Kai Tak and Northern District, as well as the sluggish development of the New Territories Cycling Network.  Moreover, we believe that now is the time to address the yawning policy void that the government has with regards to cycling.

It is vital that the new Legco is able to press our government to implement the visionary policies we need if Hong Kong is to properly serve the increasing number of cyclists of all stripes, and more importantly to justify its ‘world city’ label with planning and administration that integrates cycling, to ease traffic congestion, facilitate personal mobility, improve the quality of our environment (air pollution, noise pollution, excessive concrete and roads) and raise health and wellness levels for our whole population.

See what the candidates had to say.

 

 

 

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The Hong Kong Cycling Association (HKCA) provides year-round courses.

The All Future Cyclists’ Race is held every weekend at Yuen Wo Road playground.

The association provides bicycles and helmets for this course, which covers the very basics. There are five races each year.

There is also a useful Cycling Proficiency Scheme course at Tai Wai every weekend. There is no age restriction.

On Saturday, the course is from 2 pm to 6 pm, and on Sunday it is between 9 am and 12 pm.

Cyclists are taught ‘egg-shape’ turning and given a basic introduction to the construction of bicycles.

Enthusiasts are also taught how to choose a bike when they rent one, basic control while they are riding, V-shape turning and how to use gears – a frequently misunderstood aspect of the sport.

‘Many people go through this elementary course during the summer, before October. This is a useful course for cyclists who haven’t yet grasped the basics of cycling,’ said Walter Yue.

‘Upon completion of this course, they can go on to the intermediate course where road riding basics are taught – like how to read simple road signs.’ Students who want to take the pastime a step further can go on courses for track and road racers.

For those who want to take up track racing, their is an elementary course at the Hong Kong Sports Institute’s cycling ‘velodrome’.

The course is held three times a week, from 7 pm to 9 pm.

Cyclists are expected to take examinations. If they pass the course, they can take part in the Youth Cycling Scheme which is every Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

The venues are the institute’s velodrome at Bridepool’s Road or Pak Tam Chung in Sai Kung.

If track or road cycling do not appeal, bike enthusiasts can take courses in cycle-ball and artistic cycling.

Cycle-ball courses are at the South China Athletic Association in Causeway Bay, and are open to enthusiasts over 15 years old. Artistic cycling is open to anyone aged over seven. Cyclists meet for basic instruction at Causeway Bay every Saturday from 4-6 pm and Sunday from 9-11 am.

Artistic cycling courses are taken by Semuel Shing, an international official, while cycle ball – a combination of cycling and football – is taught by Nelson Chan. Road racing is taught by Hong Kong’s national coach Shen Jinkang.

Mountain biking is the latest craze, but there are as yet no courses.

‘One of the biggest problems we face is that there is lack of space for this sport. We currently have two venues for mounting biking – in Shui Mei Chuen and Wang Chau Industrial Estate,’ Yue said.

For more information, call the HKCA on 2573 3861 or fax 2834 3715.

 

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Junior Police Call (JPC) members are not only dedicated to helping the police fight crime, but also very enthusiastic in driving home road safety messages.

The recent participation of the Sha Tin JPCs in a cycling safety publicity function was a good example.

More than 20 members took part in the ‘Sha Tin Safe Cycling Day’, which was held in the Tai Wai Bicycle Park. The function aimed at reminding cyclists to observe road rules in order to fully enjoy the fun of riding bicycles.

At the opening ceremony, the JPCs, some of whom were clearly bicycle enthusiasts, demonstrated cycling skills, while the others, joined by members of the Road Safety Patrol, distributed publicity leaflets to bicycle riders along the bicycle track leading from Sha Tin to Tai Po.

The colourful leaflets carried 12 lively cartoon pictures urging cyclists to observe road users’ codes while enjoying their rides. Over 15,000 leaflets were given out in the course of the morning.

One of the safety guidelines called on riders to keep their bicycles to the road’s left lane, unless they wanted to overtake the bicycle in front of them.

Meanwhile, other JPC members rode on an open-deck bus decorated with cycling safety messages and took part in a parade from Tai Wai Train Station to Ma On Shan.

Senior Superintendent (Traffic NT South) David Thomas said at the function that 681 traffic accidents involving bicycles occurred last year, of which eight resulted in death and 216 led to serious injuries. The figure represented a 17 per cent increase over the toll of 584 in 1993.

‘Many of these accidents could have been avoided had these cyclists taken safety measures and paid attention when they were riding,’ Mr Thomas said.

Noting that the promotion of safe cycling was an important item of the district’s road safety education this year, Mr Thomas said that Sha Tin was one of the districts in the territory where cycle tracks were built along highways and roads for use solely by bicycle riders.

‘In October last year, Tai Wai Bicycle Park became a gazetted area for the riding of three-or four-wheel multicycles,’ Mr Thomas said.

‘Although cyclists are provided with such good facilities, the responsibility for safety rests with the cyclists themselves.’ The ‘1995 Sha Tin Safe Cycling Day’ was organised by the Road Safety Office of the Traffic Police’s NT South Region and the Sha Tin District Board.

 

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Cyclists, enjoy yourselves – but please observe the road rules, for your own safety.

Like other road-users, cyclists should also strictly observe road regulations, traffic signs and road markings in order to fully enjoy the fun of riding bicycles, said Senior Superintendent of Police (New Territories South Traffic), David Thomas.

Mr Thomas was officiating at the launching of the ‘1995 Sha Tin Safe Cycling Day’, held at the Tai Wai Bicycle Park last week. He revealed that there was a drastic increase in the number of bicycle traffic accident last year.

In 1994, there were as many as 681 accidents involving bicycles, resulting in eight deaths and 216 cases of serious injury. The figure represented a 17 per cent increase over the toll of 584 in 1993.

‘Many of these accidents could have been avoided had these cyclists taken safety measures and paid attention when they were riding,’ Mr Thomas said.

Noting that the promotion of safe cycling was an important item of the district’s road safety education this year, Mr Thomas said that Sha Tin was one of the districts in the territory where cycle tracks were built along highways and roads for the sole use of bicycle riders.

In October last year, the Tai Wai Bicycle Park became a gazetted area for the riding of three-or four-wheel multi-cycles.

‘Although cyclists are provided with such facilities, the responsibility for safety rests with the cyclists themselves.’ The safe cycling day publicity drive featured a cycling demonstration by the Bicycle Association and an open-deck bus parade running from Tai Wai train station to Ma On Shan.

 

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