Header

幾個月之前本網站做了一個有關日本單車友善的圖片報導,而日本京都在最近一次的單車友善排名全球第二,相信日本京都一定有值得觀摩及取經之處;筆者最近就親身體驗了在京都踩單車的情況,讓我報導一下:

 

京都有好幾家出租單車的公司,我用的這家叫Kyoto Eco Trip,能說一口流利英語的員工Ayako非常細心協助我們及講解在京都踩單車要注意的事情。背後的是電力輔助單車,在京都也見到不少人使用↓

IMG_20141119_091916

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

在日本(包括京都),在行人路上踩單車是合法及一貫的做法,而我所看到的單車徑/專用道,都在行人路上,(攝於五条通)↓

DSC09682

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

而路上無專用單車徑時,踩單車的人就和行人共享空間。↓

DSC09651

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

停泊單車的情況

路旁、大廈、商店及住宅都不難發現單車停泊設施↓

DSC08785

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

商廈外的單車停泊設施↓

DSC09295

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

住宅單車停泊設施↓

DSC09721

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

而把單車隨便停在路邊,單車有可能被移走,車主要前往指定的地點交罰款2300日元取回單車。↓

DSC09659

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

放在違規停泊單車上的提示↓

DSC09643

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

除了可以在行人路及單車徑踏,還可以選擇在馬路上踏單車。↓

DSC09725

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

公共單車

京都巿的公共單車,租金500日元2小時,1000日元24小時↓

DSC08777

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSC08786

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

總的來說,京都雖然是汽車主導馬路的城巿,但因為有深厚的單車文化,及對使用單車者的尊重,並且讓單車可以和行人共享行人路,以致巿民可以方便及安全地用單車代步,在京都很常見到一般巿民、學生、長者、婦女使用單車代步,相反,穿著單車衣載頭盔的單車運動愛好者卻不常見到。

最近無線電視明珠台製作了一個有關京都單車文化的節目,值得一看:

http://mytv.tvb.com/news/pearlreport/193520

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share This :

In Legco yesterday, the tourism industry rep, YIU Si Wing (姚思榮) asked Transport and Housing Bureau if it was/would:

(a) extend the cycle track network to former Frontier area;
(b) develop cycle tracks on the harbourfront;
(c) set up a public bicycle hiring system
(d) promote cycling tourism

Responses from Anthony Cheung, the Secretary for Transport and Housing, were, in summary:

a) yes, perhaps;
b) [ignored question];
c) no; and
d) ‘yes’ [but actually only trivially]

The first ‘perhaps’ is worth noting: about cycle tracks going into the former Frontier Closed Area.  All leisure cycle tracks are a plus for Hong Kong, though we need to keep pointing out that they are merely a feature, and certainly not the sum total of cycling here, as TD likes to pretend.  So half a cheer for that ‘perhaps’.

Regarding public bicycle rental systems, the Secretary referred to the TD study that was finally released earlier this year (“Traffic and Transport Consultancy Study on Cycling Networks and Parking Facilities in Existing New Towns in Hong Kong“), which was overly narrow in scope, two years late, trivial in its analysis and negative or inconclusive on the issues it was supposed to study.

Based on that, he rejected any kind of public bicycle rental system (referring to new towns, and ignoring everywhere else), because a) it needs many nodes; b) it requires some load balancing between nodes (moving bikes around to meet need); c) maintenance of bikes; d) existing private rental services “can already meet demand”; e) Hong Kong’s land resources are too limited to provide public rental points.

What a load of tripe!  Firstly, there are also excellent potential locations for a public bike share scheme outside the new towns, such as in Kai Tak Development / CBD2, West Kowloon, along the new NT Cycle Track Network, and of course, along the Harbourfront Cycleway (when we ultimately force it into existence).

His responses a), b) and c) simply cite characteristics of a public bicycle rental system, no different from those handled by the 500+ (and rapidly rising) schemes around the world, especially in mainland China.  Along with response e), he’s peddling the old canard that Hong Kong is so special that the rest of the world can teach us nothing.  And finally, by citing existing rental he is missing the whole value of a network of pick-up and drop-off points. (actually ‘protecting’ the business of a handful of operators, who’d probably anyway benefit from the upsurge in interest, if only they could adapt to it.)

The question about developing cycle tracks along the harbourfront was flatly ignored.  How can a government minister do that?  Didn’t the THB read the question?  Does it think no one will notice?  Or does it simply have no respect for Legco and not care who knows?

All in all, the Secretary’s reply showed that our government still doesn’t ‘get’ cycling, or its obligation to work for us.

More work to do.

See:
Press release, with full text

Blogpost about cycle tracks (‘我們的單車徑’) by Secretary for Development Paul Chan (陳茂波),
22 Sept 2013 (Chinese only)

 

 

Share This :