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Author Archives: Hong Kong Cycling Alliance

HK Public Space Initiative – Vision of the Harbour Promenade

December 29th, 2011 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in events | Harbourfront Cycleway | transport - (0 Comments)

Looking forward to the Hong Kong Public Space Initiative forum coming on the 7th January 2012… it will be a great place to air our views on allowing more access to the harbourfront for cyclists to influential people.

The forum is being conducted in Cantonese, however they are providing simultaneous written interpretation (similar to a subtitle service) through providing each English speaker an electronic device (e.g. iPad/Laptop) connected to our translator’s computer by wifi, then the translator will type the main points raised by speakers to the messenger in real time.

more information here:

Official Event Page (with Registration Form)

Facebook Event Page

If you are interested in joining us there, comment below or send us an email.

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New Transport Dept Cycling Information Centre Website

December 21st, 2011 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in transport | Transport Department - (1 Comments)

What do you think of the new Transport Department information for cyclists?  Share your comments here!

Cycling Information Centre (English)

Cycling Information Centre (Chinese)

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HKPSI Public Seminar

December 8th, 2011 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in events | Harbourfront Cycleway - (1 Comments)

This is a great opportunity to get together with like-minded people who want to make Hong Kong’s harbourfront areas public and accessible to everyone!

The “Vision for Waterfront Promenades in Victoria Harbour” public seminar is being held in Cantonese, but they are hoping to get simultaneous translations into english.

From HKPSI:

Founded by a group of young people, the Hong Kong Public Space Initiative (“HKPSI”) is a charitable organization (IRD File No. 91/11733) that aims to bring the knowledge of public space into the public sphere through promotion and education.

Believing you might be interested, we are cordially inviting your members to attend our very first public seminar titled “Vision for Waterfront Promenades in Victoria Harbour”, of which Mrs. Carrie Lam (林鄭月娥女士), Secretary for Development, is going to deliver a speech, followed by a panel discussion comprising professionals from different fields: Mrs. Winnie Kang (姜梁詠怡女士) Principal Assistant Secretary (Harbour), Development Bureau Prof. Mee Kam Ng (伍美琴教授) Professor, Department of Geog. & Resource Mgt., CUHK Prof. Patrick Lau (劉秀成教授) Legislative Councilor Ms. Christine Loh (陸恭蕙女士) Chairperson, Society for Protection of the Harbour Ir. Albert Lai (黎廣德先生) Director & Ex-Chairman, Conservancy Association Mr. Wong Ho Yin (王浩賢先生) Committee Member, Land Justice League.

This promises to be both an excellent learning opportunity and a golden chance for the public to raise out opinions and vision for the promenades.

For more information, please visit:-

Official Event Page (with Registration Form)

Facebook Event Page

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5th Harbourfront Bike Ride

November 1st, 2011 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in events - (1 Comments)

The 5th Harbourfront Bike Ride was joined by hundreds of cyclists, of all kinds of cycling experience and on all kinds of bikes (and a few other human-powered wheeled conveyances!)  On a fine afternoon, as well as having a good time together, the message was made loud and clear that cycling has a place on Hong Kong island.

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Hong Kong Ride of Silence – Wed. 18th May 2011

May 12th, 2011 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in events | Ride of Silence - (0 Comments)

The 2011 Hong Kong Ride of Silence is nearly here again. It is held every year on the third Wednesday of May, to remember the cyclists being killed and injured every year on our roads

Date: Wednesday 18th May

Time: 7:30pm

Location: Tsim Sha Tsui Clock Tower

Notes: The star ferry will only allow 10 bikes per ferry journey from Wanchai, so be sure to get there a little early to make sure that you can get on a ferry in time, and chat with fellow cyclists.

See you there..!

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Trails opened to mountain bikers

October 18th, 1997 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in SCMP | uncategorised - (0 Comments)

The Government has increased the number of country park trails open to mountain bikers following an outcry from frustrated riders.

The two extra trails – one at Chi Ma Wan in the Lantau South Country Park and another in the Shek O Country Park – will give riders a choice of four routes.

The move followed warnings made by the Hong Kong Mountain Bike Association that a wave of individual riders would break laws to ride on country parks trails unless their choice of routes was expanded.

Bikers say the two existing routes, along a concrete water catchment in south Lantau and a remote track in the Sai Kung West Country Park, are unsuitable and remote.

Hong Kong Mountain Bike Association chairman Richard Barton-Smith welcomed the new routes, but said they were only a beginning.

‘It is a very good start. We hope it leads to development of a more comprehensive network of trails across the territory,’ Mr Barton-Smith said.

The association had urged the Agriculture and Fisheries Department to open two tracks on Lantau – one around Chi Ma Wan and another near the Big Buddha.

The department agreed to open the Chi Ma Wan trail and a Shek O route, but said the trail from the Big Buddha was unsafe for cyclists.

‘It is not suitable. It is very steep – we have considered it very carefully,’ said assistant director Wong Fook-yee.

Mountain bikers wanting to use the country park trails can apply for a free one-year riding permit from the department.

The scheme would be placed under continuous review to ensure bikers and hikers did not clash and the paths were not eroded, Mr Wong said.

 

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Cyclists threaten to defy country-park ban

October 13th, 1997 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in SCMP | uncategorised - (0 Comments)

Mountain bikers warn frustration over laws banning them from country parks could erupt in a wave of illegal rides unless the Government opens up more trails to cyclists.

Under the Country Parks Ordinance, cycling in all but two areas in country parks is prohibited and punishable with a maximum $2,000 fine and three months in prison.

The Hong Kong Mountain Bike Association proposes allowing riders on two country park trails on Lantau Island in a pilot scheme integrating bikers and hikers.

Convictions for biking in country parks have increased dramatically since 1993, when 17 were prosecuted, to 110 last year.

Association chairman Richard Barton-Smith said bikers were becoming increasingly frustrated.

‘Tension in the biking community is rising, especially among those who have been arrested. They are seriously angry,’ he said.

‘A lot of people have gone out and bought bikes and suddenly realise that riding is illegal.’ The Agriculture and Fisheries Department set up a pilot permit scheme this year on two routes – South Lantau and Sai Kung.

Association member Brian Paterson said the concrete path along a water catchment in South Lantau and the remote Wan Tsai peninsula in Sai Kung West Country Park were hardly ideal.

But the 869 permits issued expired in August. Mr Barton-Smith said there had been no further official communication, and bikers had no idea where they stood.

The 150-member association has been forced to restrict its monthly fun-rides to Lamma and North Lantau, but many individuals were breaking the law, he said.

‘Very definitely people will break the law, simply because you’re not going to stop a growing sport,’ said Mr Barton-Smith.

The association has suggested two existing country park trails – down from the Big Buddha and around the Chi Ma Wan peninsula on Lantau – be opened to bikers.

Mr Barton-Smith said bikers and hikers could avoid potential conflict by common courtesy. Biking caused no more damage to trails than walkers, he said.

With about 2,000 mountain bikers in Hong Kong, which offers some of the most challenging riding in the world, the sport was growing and could bring in eco-tourism dollars, he added.

Agriculture and Fisheries Department assistant director Wong Fook-yee said the proposals were being considered and a decision would be made this month.

Hong Kong lags behind Singapore, which set up trails four years ago.

 

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Pedal-power comes to parks

February 24th, 1997 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in SCMP | uncategorised - (0 Comments)

Cyclists will be allowed to ride through two country parks during a six-month trial starting today. Permits will be issued by the Agriculture and Fisheries Department for Sai Kung West Country Park (Wan Tsai Extension) and the catchment area from Tung Chung Road to Kau Ling Chung in Lantau South Country Park, which were previously off-limits to cyclists.

Senior Country Parks Officer Lai Ching-wai said applicants, aged between 12 and 18, should seek endorsement from parents or guardians on their application letters.

‘The department will not accept any group applications nor applicants under the age of 12,’ he added.

No fee will be charged but permit-holders should observe the code of practice for cyclists and have the necessary safety equipment, including suitable helmets. Cyclists should apply for permits from the Director of Agriculture and Fisheries. The application, in the form of a letter, should be addressed to Canton Road Government Offices, 14/F, 393 Canton Road, Kowloon or faxed to 2311 3731.

Mr Lai said there were many locations in country parks where no permit was required for bicycle riding. Among those are Plover Cove Main Dam and its access roads, Hok Tau Road, Kam Shan Road, Lau Shui Heung Road, Shing Mun Road, Tai Mong Tsai Road, Pak Tam Road, Hoi Ha Road and the cycling track at Tai Mong Tsai. Other than in those areas, cycling is strictly prohibited in country parks or special areas.

 

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Courses to help you become one of territory’s chain gang

October 26th, 1996 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in SCMP | uncategorised - (0 Comments)

The Hong Kong Cycling Association (HKCA) provides year-round courses.

The All Future Cyclists’ Race is held every weekend at Yuen Wo Road playground.

The association provides bicycles and helmets for this course, which covers the very basics. There are five races each year.

There is also a useful Cycling Proficiency Scheme course at Tai Wai every weekend. There is no age restriction.

On Saturday, the course is from 2 pm to 6 pm, and on Sunday it is between 9 am and 12 pm.

Cyclists are taught ‘egg-shape’ turning and given a basic introduction to the construction of bicycles.

Enthusiasts are also taught how to choose a bike when they rent one, basic control while they are riding, V-shape turning and how to use gears – a frequently misunderstood aspect of the sport.

‘Many people go through this elementary course during the summer, before October. This is a useful course for cyclists who haven’t yet grasped the basics of cycling,’ said Walter Yue.

‘Upon completion of this course, they can go on to the intermediate course where road riding basics are taught – like how to read simple road signs.’ Students who want to take the pastime a step further can go on courses for track and road racers.

For those who want to take up track racing, their is an elementary course at the Hong Kong Sports Institute’s cycling ‘velodrome’.

The course is held three times a week, from 7 pm to 9 pm.

Cyclists are expected to take examinations. If they pass the course, they can take part in the Youth Cycling Scheme which is every Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

The venues are the institute’s velodrome at Bridepool’s Road or Pak Tam Chung in Sai Kung.

If track or road cycling do not appeal, bike enthusiasts can take courses in cycle-ball and artistic cycling.

Cycle-ball courses are at the South China Athletic Association in Causeway Bay, and are open to enthusiasts over 15 years old. Artistic cycling is open to anyone aged over seven. Cyclists meet for basic instruction at Causeway Bay every Saturday from 4-6 pm and Sunday from 9-11 am.

Artistic cycling courses are taken by Semuel Shing, an international official, while cycle ball – a combination of cycling and football – is taught by Nelson Chan. Road racing is taught by Hong Kong’s national coach Shen Jinkang.

Mountain biking is the latest craze, but there are as yet no courses.

‘One of the biggest problems we face is that there is lack of space for this sport. We currently have two venues for mounting biking – in Shui Mei Chuen and Wang Chau Industrial Estate,’ Yue said.

For more information, call the HKCA on 2573 3861 or fax 2834 3715.

 

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Biker gears up as parks crack down

October 22nd, 1996 | Posted by Hong Kong Cycling Alliance in SCMP | uncategorised - (0 Comments)

Amateur mountain biker Sin Tak-chiu, 32, is hoping to represent Hong Kong in next month’s Asian Mountain Bike Championships in Taiwan.

Mr Sin started cycling 16 years ago and switched to mountain biking almost eight years ago.

A member of the Hong Kong Cycling Association, he takes part in almost every local mountain cycling competition and has competed in Japan, Taiwan and the Netherlands.

But he says he has been forced to cut his training lately as the Government is cracking down on cyclists in country parks.

Mr Sin lives with his parents in Sheung Shui.

What’s on your mind? I’m hoping the Government will let us cycle in the country parks. More than 90 per cent of Hong Kong’s mountain roads are in country parks, so it’s hard to find anywhere else to train.

How do you train? I don’t have a coach because I’ve got more than 10 years’ experience riding BMX bicycles, so it’s not difficult for me to handle mountain cycling myself. Usually, I spend about six hours a week training with my friends. We ride from Repulse Bay to Shek O just for fitness training.

We now seldom go to the country parks as the increasing number of prosecutions has really scared us off.

Any tips for beginners? The first thing is to fit yourself out with safety equipment like helmets and pads. And it’s better to go cycling with experienced cyclists when you’re learning. It’s dangerous if there’s an accident on the mountain and no one’s around to help. A new mountain bike costs anything from $3,000 to more than $30,000, but learners don’t need to buy expensive ones.

What’s your goal for future competitions? I’m looking forward to getting a better result in the local competition two weeks away. Five bikers will be selected to enter the Asian Championship after the race. I’m hoping I’ll be one of them. I also want to introduce cycling to more people, because it’s safe and inexpensive. The exercise helps people lose weight. Mountain biking is even more enjoyable; you travel to the country and take pleasure in the environment.

 

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